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Wednesday, April 22, 2020 | History

1 edition of Trees in Anglo-Saxon England found in the catalog.

Trees in Anglo-Saxon England

Della Hooke

Trees in Anglo-Saxon England

literature, lore and landscape

by Della Hooke

  • 386 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Boydell in Woodbridge .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Trees in literature,
  • Trees,
  • Folklore,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [285]-302) and index.

    StatementDella Hooke
    SeriesAnglo-Saxon studies -- 13, Anglo-Saxon studies -- 13.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSD179 .H66 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 310 p. :
    Number of Pages310
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24864583M
    ISBN 101843835657
    ISBN 109781843835653
    LC Control Number2011380899
    OCLC/WorldCa502045728


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Trees in Anglo-Saxon England by Della Hooke Download PDF EPUB FB2

Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role. But they are also powerful icons in many pre-Christian religions, with a degree of tree symbolism Cited by: This wide-ranging book, Trees in Anglo-Saxon England, explores both the "real", historical and archaeological evidence of trees and woodland, and as they are depicted in Anglo-Saxon literature.

Trees in Anglo-Saxon England: Literature, Lore and Landscape Della Hooke Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role.

Trees in Anglo-Saxon England Book Description: Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role.

Trees and Timber in the Anglo-Saxon World constitutes the very first collection of essays written about the role of trees in early medieval England, bringing together established specialists and new voices to present an interdisciplinary insight into the complex relationship between the early English.

Trees in Anglo-Saxon England: literature, lore and landscape / Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both Trees in Anglo-Saxon England book wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role.

Trees in Anglo-Saxon England: Literature, Lore and Landscape, by Della Hooke Della Hooke’s work on the Anglo-Saxon landscape is well known and is distinctive in its historical-geographical approach and use of Anglo-Saxon charters, particularly those with boundary : Grenville Astill.

A powerful exploration of trees in both the real and the imagined Anglo-Saxon landscape. Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role. Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role.

But they are also powerful icons in many pre-Christian religions, with a degree of tree symbolism found in Christian scripture too/5(14). Buy Trees in Anglo-Saxon England: Literature, Lore and Landscape (Anglo-Saxon Studies) by Della Hooke (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low /5(10). Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role. But. Della Hooke has 18 books on Goodreads with ratings.

Della Hooke’s most popular book is Trees in Anglo-Saxon England: Literature, Lore and Landscape. Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role.

But they are also powerful icons in many pre-Christian religions, with a degree of tree symbolism found in Christian scripture too/5(11). ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: VII, Seiten Karten, Illustrationen: Contents: Trees and groves in pre-Christian beliefChristianity and the sacred treeTrees in literatureTrees, mythology and national consciousness: into the futureThe nature and distribution of Anglo-Saxon woodlandThe use of Anglo-Saxon woodland: place-names and charter evidenceTrees in.

Download Trees In Anglo Saxon England in PDF and EPUB Formats for free. Trees In Anglo Saxon England Book also available for Read Online, mobi, docx and mobile and kindle reading. Trees were of fundamental importance in Anglo-Saxon society.

Anglo-Saxons dwelt in timber houses, relied on woodland as an economic resource, and created a material culture of wood which was at least as meaningfully-imbued, Trees in Anglo-Saxon England book vastly more prevalent, than the sculpture and metalwork with which we associate them today.

Trees held a central place in Anglo-Saxon belief systems, which carried into. Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role.

But they are also powerful icons in many pre-Christian religions, with. Part I, ‘Tree Symbolism’, explores, across four chapters, trees and groves in pre-Christian belief, the tree in Christian tradition, and the syncretism of Christian and non-Christian beliefs in Anglo-Saxon England, moving on to trees in Anglo-Saxon literature, and the continuing mythology and folklore of trees in England up to the present.

Trees were of fundamental importance in Anglo-Saxon material culture - but they were also a powerful presence in Anglo-Saxon religion before and after the introduction of Christianity.

This book shows that they remained prominent in early English Christianity, and indeed that they may have played a crucial role in mediating the transition.

Her book Trees in Anglo-Saxon England complements the earlier collection From Earth to Art: The Many Aspects of the Plant-World in Anglo-Saxon England (), to which Hooke contributed.

The book examines in detail the evidence for real trees in Anglo-Saxon England and speculates on their spiritual and symbolic dimensions. As England's navy grew, the need for timber began to seriously pick away at the woodland: from an estimated land coverage of 15% inEngland's forests and woods had dwindled to just % by Author: Bibi Van Der Zee.

The chapter offers a wide-ranging discussion of the state of current research that engages with the function of trees and timber in their various uses. Topics are approached sequentially, offering an overview of the role of trees and their products in material culture, in early medieval ontologies of wood and timber, within systems of Christian and pre-Christian belief, in the early medieval.

The Black Poplar Tree in Anglo-Saxon England By Peter C Horn The distinguished botanist, the late Edgar Milne-Redhead, from the mid ′s, did much to draw attention to the Black Poplar, Populus nigra subsp.

betulifolia, as a splended, but largely overlooked, English native tree. The fauna of Anglo-Saxon England was plentiful and varied, and included some animals that have since been made extinct in this country.

The vast areas of uninhabited forests, heaths and fells were home to many creatures, in addition to the other wild creatures that inhabited the towns and villages including the domestic animals. Trees hold a particular role in Germanic paganism and Germanic mythology, both as individuals (sacred trees) and in groups (sacred groves).The central role of trees in Germanic religion is noted in the earliest written reports about the Germanic peoples, with the Roman historian Tacitus stating that Germanic cult practices took place exclusively in groves rather than temples.

I INTRODUCTION: THE ORIGINS OF THE ANGLO-SAXON KINGDOMS 1 Written sources: British 1 Written sources: Anglo-Saxon 3 Archaeological evidence 5 The political structure of Anglo-Saxon England c.

9 The nature of early Anglo-Saxon kingship 15 Sources for the study of kings and kingdoms from the seventh to the ninth centuries 19 II KENT 25 Sources Life in Anglo-Saxon Britain (A Child's History of Britain) Anglo-Saxons and Vikings. Saxon Tales: The Witch Who Faced the Fire.

Anglo Saxon Britain. Beowulf Planning Pack. Kings and Warriors. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Beowulf: DragonSlayer. Anglo Saxon Activity Books. Smashing Saxons. Arthur High King of Britain. The Sword in the Stone. The Anglo-Saxons were a cultural group who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century.

They comprised people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted many aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and language.

The Anglo-Saxons established the Kingdom of England, and the modern English language. Hooke, Della. Trees in Anglo-Saxon England:: Literature, Lore and Landscape.

Anglo-Saxon Studies. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, Pp. xii, British Kingdoms (each area ruled by a different king) Anglo Saxons Houses and Saxon villages.

We know what Saxons houses may have looked like from excavations of Anglo Saxon villages, such as the one at West Stow in the east of England. Here, an early Anglo-Saxon village (cAD) has been carefully reconstructed where it was excavated. The Cult of Kingship in Anglo-Saxon England: The Transition from Paganism to Christianity.

California: University of California Press. Ewing, Thor (). Gods and Worshippers in the Viking and Germanic World. Tempus. ISBN Griffiths, Bill (). Aspects of Anglo-Saxon Magic. Anglo-Saxon Books. ISBN Hutton, Ronald. An Introduction to Trees and Timber in the Anglo-Saxon World An Introduction to Trees and Timber in the Anglo-Saxon World Chapter: (p.1) 1 An Introduction to Trees and Timber in the Anglo-Saxon World Source: Trees and Timber in the Anglo-Saxon World Author(s): Michael D.J.

Bintley Michael G. Shapland Publisher: Oxford University Press. Anglo Saxon Manuscript map Cancel Edit Delete Preview revert Text of the note (may include Wiki markup) Could not save your note (edit conflict or other problem).

Anglo Saxon Weapons & Armour - Angelcynn Re-Enactment Society The principle weapon of the Anglo-Saxons was the spear. Spearheads came in many styles (Swanton classified 21 different. For those readers who want a far more detailed and academic examination of this area, I recommend the work of Alaric Hall, lecturer in medieval English literature at Leeds University.

You will readily find online pdf copies of his book Elves in Anglo-Saxon England and of his PhD thesis from which the book derives.

As his job indicates, his. Here are some facts about Anglo-Saxon farms and agriculture. Anglo-Saxon farming was widespread throughout Britain, and almost everybody worked on a farm. They raised chickens, goats, sheep, pigs and cows and grew a range of crops and vegetables.

Most Anglo-Saxon farms and villages were built close to a source of fresh water. They were usually [ ]. However, Anglo-Saxon texts do reveal certain aspects of the Pagan religion and trees, with the Anglo-Saxon god Wōden (Óðinn, in the Norse religion that came later), who hung on the Cosmic Tree in order to try to find the answer to the riddle of death and, in doing so, identified the power of the Runes (for Anglo-Saxons, there were two runic.

Anglo-Saxon England was early medieval England, existing from the 5th to the 11th centuries from the end of Roman Britain until the Norman conquest in It consisted of various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until when it was united as the Kingdom of England by King Æthelstan (r.

It became part of the short-lived North Sea Empire of Cnut the Great, a personal union between England. The Woodland Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales (No. ) and in Scotland (No.

SC). A non-profit-making company limited by guarantee. Registered in England No. Woodland Trust (Enterprises) Limited, registered in England (No. ), is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Woodland Trust. The word pagan is a Latin term that was used by Christians in Anglo-Saxon England to designate non-Christians.

In Old English, the vernacular language of Anglo-Saxon England, the equivalent term was hæðen ("heathen"), a word that was cognate to the Old Norse heiðinn, both of which may derive from a Gothic word, haiþno. Both pagan and heathen were terms that carried pejorative overtones.

- I write historical romance set in Anglo-Saxon England, but love any genre of novel set in this age. Apart from Bernard Cornwall's series, there don't seem to be many novels (especially romance) set in Anglo-Saxon England available - so I have decided to create a list for all those who love reading books set in this era!.

See more ideas about Novels, Historical romance and Books pins. This riveting and authoritative USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestseller is “a much-needed, modern account of the Normans in England” (The Times, London).

The Norman Conquest was the most significant military—and cultural—episode in English history. An invasion on a scale not seen since the days of the Romans, it was capped by one of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ever /5(17).For more about Anglo-Saxon law and society, I highly recommend The Beginnings of English Society by Dorothy Whitelock, Penguin Books ; and Alfred the Great: Asser’s Life of King Alfred and Other Contemporary Sources, translated by Simon Keynes and Michael Lapidge, Penguin Booksfrom which I excerpted portions of Ælfred’s law code.